Friday, February 22, 2008

Google's Microsoft Yahoo Internet Doomsday Scenario: Google's Brin [SearchEngineWatch]

Google's Microsoft Yahoo Internet Doomsday Scenario: Google's Brin [SearchEngineWatch]

Yesterday Google co-founder Sergey Brin described the Internet doomsday scenario if Microsoft wins its Yahoo takeover bid. How does Google love thee, Microsoft? Let me count the ways:

Internet innovation? At risk.
Antitrust laws? Violated.
Internet users? Harmed.

From Internet Marketing

Is The Time Ripe For Search Marketing Standards?

Is The Time Ripe For Search Marketing Standards?

Over the past ten to twelve years, various SEM practitioners have brought up the need for industry standards. I started asking the question in 1998, and others have brought it up since, but the industry seems to have a laissez faire attitude.

Albeit, we've seen some standardization steps taken by the search engines themselves. Google, Yahoo!, and Microsoft got together on the Sitemaps protocol, and Google, Ask.com, and Microsoft are now anonymizing log file data. Subsequently, Google called for international privacy standards. The November 2007 FTC public forum on behavioral advertising also focused on privacy concerns. These are all steps toward industry standardization with regard to consumer privacy, an issue search engines must address to maintain public trust. But search engines are not as motivated to establish standards for search engine marketing tactics.

From Internet Marketing and Online Annonsering

Inside AdWords: Meet our AdWords Evangelist in San Jose

Inside AdWords: Meet our AdWords Evangelist in San Jose

Thursday, February 21, 2008

Google to sell display ads in Web videos | Technology | Internet | Reuters

Google to sell display ads in Web videos | Technology | Internet | Reuters

Google Inc. plans to start selling ads to appear in Web videos after it agreed a partnership with YuMe, an online video advertising network.

YuMe, a Redwood City, California-based start-up, said on Thursday, it will serve InVideo overlay adverts as part of Google's AdSense for video beta advertising program.

Google has traditionally used AdSense for text-only advertising but said the video program extends its offer to targeted, contextually-relevant video graphical ads and text overlays.

Google has been working on ways of developing advertising revenue for online video since it bought YouTube, the video-sharing site, in November 2006.

As Internet access speeds become faster around the world more television and Hollywood-produced video content is moving to the Web on sites like Hulu.com, owned by News Corp and NBC Universal, and Fancast.com, owned by Comcast Corp.

From Internet Marketing

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

SEOmoz | How to Track the Evolution of Search Engine Algorithms & Why It's Important to Do So

SEOmoz | How to Track the Evolution of Search Engine Algorithms & Why It's Important to Do So

Drive More Organic Traffic by Understanding Search Engine Algorithms
The Seattle-based blog SEOmoz, Rand Fishkin asks "What is an Algorithm? How does it apply to the Search Results at Google, Yahoo! & MSN/Live?" The post, How to Track the Evolution of Search Engine Algorithms & Why It's Important to Do So, amounts to a free clinic regarding the "whys" and "hows" for professionals seeking to garner more organic search traffic.

"The vast majority of search marketers operating in the organic space at least lay claim to "following the latest algorithms" at the search engines, and in 90% of the client pitches I've ever heard (or made, for that matter), the subject comes up at least once. However, I think this is still a topic about which there's not a lot of true understanding and for those new to the field, it's probably the most daunting aspect of the work. So, to help ease some pain, I figured I'd address many of the most common questions about keeping up with the search engines' ever-changing mathematical formulas that rank search results."
Rand Fishkin

The article gets to the algorithmic red meat: inherent trust in link metrics, domain trust over the importance of individual pages, temporal analysis of link growth, sandboxing of new websites, fixing blog comment spam, and Google's recent crackdown on reciprocal tactics.

From Internet Marketing and Online Annonsering

Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Yahoo Block Google From Delicious Bookmarks

Yahoo Block Google From Delicious Bookmarks:

During the weekend, Yahoo!'s social bookmarking property del.icio.us seems to have prevented robots of other search engines including Google from spidering the website or fishing out fresh web pages, bookmarks and websites, observes Collin. It was clear that it was not a simple robots.txt exclusion, rather it was a 404 response that was being shown based on who the requesting User-Agent was.

From Internet Marketing

Web Advertising and Behavioral Targeting: Service Providers Strike Back



Web Advertising and Behavioral Targeting: Service Providers Strike Back
: "In the quest for behavioral targeting, companies who control ad networks have been working as hard as possible to allow advertisers to reach Web surfers based on their online behavior and not just what page they happen to be on.

The company best positioned to take advantage of behavioral targeting without a doubt was once-mighty Yahoo!. The wealth of services the company offers is surely staggering; the company can ascertain what stocks you are considering, what content is in your e-mails, what sports teams you track, and much more."

From Internet Marketing and Online Annonsering

Monday, February 18, 2008

Virtual Blight & The Ten Commandments For Online Marketers

Virtual Blight & The Ten Commandments For Online Marketers

Among the most powerful trends of the last three years has been the emergence of community-social-media-social-networking sites with large user bases and incredible traffic. The traffic enjoyed by these successful virtual communities creates financial incentives for bad actors who want to hijack traffic for their own purposes. The open participation inherent in user generated content provides numerous opportunities for the parasitic marketer.

Exploits can take the form of spam posts, sock puppetry, trust fraud and scams that use social engineering to take advantage of the good faith users. The exploit may also be by way of paid advertising that promote illicit or illegal activities (porn, pills, casinos, and payday lenders) or ads that insert malware on users' computers. These anti-social and sometimes criminal activities are generally carried out despite the wishes of the site owners and community residents.

In the physical world, spam, scams and unsavory promotions have parallels: billboards, liquor stores and payday lenders on every street, and prostitutes and hustlers on every corner. These are the telltale signs of urban blight in a community and left unchecked lead to abandoned and neglected property and a spiral of decay. Urban blight creates flight; anyone who can afford to leaves.

From Internet Marketing

Sunday, February 17, 2008

Google Apps, Why use it?
The price is free, but no offline availability

The free suite of online applications from Google offers an alternative to the Microsoft universe and its Office productivity suite.
Adding some computers to the small business workplace entails making them useful for employees, while keeping the time to get people up to speed on them to a minimum. Google Apps may be helpful here.
In one swoop, a small business can add email, voice/text chat, word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and a calendar to the enterprise. All for free, with support options and extra tools available for an annual per-user rate.
As long as the Internet connection stays up, Google Apps fulfills its role for computer users. What Google has not done is make an offline version of the service that would suit the roles of mobile workers like salespeople.
Help for that should be coming soon. "It's something we're actively working on solving," Google's Matt Glotzbach said in USA Today.
The short learning curve for Google Apps should please its adopters. For those looking for a richer feature set in a free set of productivity applications, small business people can choose traditional offline suites like OpenOffice or the relaunched Lotus Symphony for document needs.

From Internet Marketing
A New Search Engine For Small Business Owners Offers information by location.

Small Business Administration has developed a new search engine for small business owners.
Users can search for information from state and local government Web sites, as well as federal Web sites, from a single search box. If a business owner types in a specific location, such as the name of a city and state the results returned will be for that geographic location. The new service improves general search services by providing results specific to doing business in a particular area.
"These new search offerings make it easier for businesses to learn about doing business in specific localities," said Nancy Sternberg, program manager of the Business Gateway Initiative.
"Try it yourself: Go to www.business.gov and find the box in the upper right that says 'Try Our New Search Engine' and click 'Read More About Search.' On the next page, type in 'business license,' type the name of your city, and see the results," said Sternberg.
Doing a brief test the search engine returned solid results. It will save time for small business owners while providing useful information.

From Internet marketing